Nordic walking with hypertension

For patients with hypertension nordic-walking is recommendable.

Nordic walking is training that exercises the hand and foot. The feet walk and the hands guide the poles. As such not only the legs are trained but the arms as well. This promotes the conditioning of bones and muscle.
The heart size and heart strength increase, and in the long-term this relieves the heart and the blood circulation, as blood pressure is lower overall. Fewer heartbeats are required to supply the body with enough oxygen.
In addition, foot and knee joints receive less stress as about 20 percent of the body weight is distributed to the poles.
The leg muscle pump is activated through the leg work. This supports the transport of blood to the heart. Blood stasis in the legs and venous disorders can be prevented

Equipment:

  • Use poles made from carbon, as these are especially light and have low vibration characteristics.
  • The guidance value for the pole length: size of body in cm * 0.7. There should be a right angle between the upper and lower arm, if the poles are perpendicular to the ground.
  • So that the joints are exposed to less stress, use shoes with good cushioning.
  • Wear breathable clothing. In cold weather, several thin coats are recommended.

What should you watch out for when Nordic walking?

  • For successful training, you should train at least 3 times per week for 30-40 minutes.
  • In order to prevent physical injury, a proper walking technique is crucial. You can learn the proper walking technique in special courses.
  • The intensity of the training should only be increased slowly.
  • Initially, additional stress due to the use of poles should not be underestimated. Carry out the first training units calmly, without poles.
  • At the start of the training, the speed and the size of the step should be gradually increased. At the end of a training session it is important to reduce the pace slowly. A slight stretching of the leg and neck muscles should round the training session off.

Hypertension and sports